• Diane

    Great instructional video. Are there different size steamers? Have you ever used the horizontal steamer they sell on the Darhma site? How big were the silk piece you were steaming? Thanks for providing these videos. I always learn new things.

    • I have the horizontal steamer and it is the same wrap instructions. I bought mine from Jacquard 10 + years ago. Love it!

      • Diane

        Thanks Karen.

    • pglose

      Hi Diane, Since the core is 60 inches long, you could steam 54-inch wide fabric (the length could unlimited) with this vertical steamer. You’d need to make your “paper core cover” wider than I have done in the video, though. The bottom section is 36 inches high; you could steam with just this part, but as far as I know they don’t make a mesh steel core this size (at least I have not been able to find one). I don’t think you can buy just the short section, it’s all sold as one unit. The largest piece I’m steaming in this video is 45 x 32 inches. I have never tried the horizontal stovetop steamer… so, thanks Karen, for your input!

      • Diane

        Thanks Pam

      • Meech Harrigan

        Hello Pam,
        I’ve only recently discovered you…thank you so much for the wonderful info…I’m less intimated now about using my vertical steamer. I will have to be sure I have the proper steel core to accomodate it. Love the tips on the paper core cover! Do you suppose since the bottom section is only 36″ high, I will have to use the top as well to fit the 36″ x 36″ scarves I intend on using? Perhaps, I should measure just to be on the safe side, but how much room should I leave on each end just in case, please?
        Thanks for all your wisdom & spunk ;o)
        Meech Harrigan

        • pglose

          Hey There, Meech! So glad you found the blog and that it’s been helpful to you. You should leave at least three inches on each end of your core. Small amounts of water can collect on the metal support rings and could possibly do some water damage to your silk. I always use BOTH sections of the vertical steamer so I can use my steel core–even when steaming smaller items. I usually let several paintings accumulate, and then steam them all at one time. I have not been able to find a mesh steel core for the smaller section, so it’s easier to just go ahead and use both steamer sections together every time you steam. You’ll never have to worry if you have enough room on your core for you silks, and the silk has to steam the same amount of time, no matter which size column you use. Let me know how it goes!

          • Meech Harrigan

            Thx so much for the detailed explanation. That makes a lot of sense and I do plan to steam several pieces at a time. I look forward to following your blog…love learning from someone that is so delightful! Let us know if you ever make it to the west coast

  • Mary Digs

    Love the art on the wall. Is it 3-d? And of course, I kind of have a feeling it is silk!!!!!!!

    • pglose

      Yes, those are my 3-D mixed media sculptures, and yes they are silk! Thanks, Mary!!!!!!

  • Terri Van Gorp

    Pamela,
    My husband and I just viewed your video and were most pleased to see that you take your time while preparing the silk to go into the steamer. Do you ever wait a few days before you actually put the paintings into the steamer? We hope to see the same paintings coming out of the steamer in your next video. We wonder if the paper will appear wet. Your videos are so detailed and we appreciate you taking the time to share your artistic talent with us.
    Terri

    • pglose

      Hi Terri! Yes, I usually wait at least a day to steam-set a silk painting once it’s finished. That gives the gutta and dyes a chance to dry completely and settle into the silk before steaming. The paper doesn’t get wet, but the outside layers do get slightly damp. That’s why I put an extra layer of paper on the outside of the roll, just for a little extra protection. Glad you are enjoying the video!